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Summer Public Health Internships Houston | Los Angeles | New York | Chicago | Miami | Seattle

Author J. Davis. Published on June 2, 2011 - 10:17 pm (1358 views — 476 words)

Public Health Internships provide real world experience to those looking to explore or gain the relevant knowledge and skills required to enter into a particular career field. Internships are relatively short term in nature with the primary focus on getting some on the job training and taking what’s learned in the classroom and applying it to the real world. Interns generally have a supervisor who assigns specific tasks and evaluates the interns overall work. For internships for credit, usually a faculty sponsor will work along with the site supervisor to ensure that the necessary learning is taking place. Interns can be high school or college students or even adults interested in trying out a new career. Many college students do internships to gain relevant experience in a particular career field as well as to get exposure to determine if they have a genuine interest in the field. Internships are an excellent way to begin building those all important connections that are invaluable in developing and maintaining a strong professional network for the future.

Internship is a system of on-the-job training for white-collar jobs, similar to an apprenticeship. Interns are usually college or university students, but they can also be high school students or post graduate adults seeking skills for a new career; they may also be as young as middle school students in some areas. Student internships provide opportunities for students to gain experience in their field, determine if they have an interest in a particular career, create a network of contacts, or gain school credit. Internships provide employers with cheap or free labor for (typically) low-level tasks. Some interns find permanent, paid employment with the companies in which they interned. Their value to the company may be increased by the fact that they need little to no training.

An internship may be either paid, unpaid or partially paid (in the form of a stipend). Paid internships are most common in the medical, architecture, science, engineering, law, business (especially accounting and finance), technology and advertising fields. Internships in non-profit organizations such as charities and think tanks are often unpaid, volunteer positions. Internships may be part-time or full-time; typically, they are part-time during the university year and full-time in the summer. They usually last 6–12 weeks, but can be shorter or longer based on the company for which they intern.

The act of job shadowing may also constitute interning.

Internship positions are available from businesses, government departments, non-profit groups and organizations. Due to strict labor laws, European internships are mostly unpaid, although they are still popular among non-Europeans in order to gain international exposure on one's résumé and for foreign language improvement.

Here is a helpful link about public health internships in Houston
http://www.houstontx.gov/health/Internship/

Los Angeles Internships
http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/odt/mphintern.htm

New York Internships
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcas/html/employment/summerintern.shtml

Chicago Internships
http://www.chicagocenter.org/internships/

Miami Internships
http://www.mph.ufl.edu/students/internshipfellowship.htm

Seattle Internships
http://depts.washington.edu/rchpol/practicums